The Information Process
Select an area from the list below:
  • The Heart of Resource-Based Learning
  • A Description of the Information Process
  • A Closer Look at the Information Process
  • BUILDING INFORMATION LITERACY  
    Introduction Information Literacy Learning Outcomes Building Plans Building Site What's New

     

    STAGES WITHIN THE INFORMATION PROCESS

    Creating New Information Stage (by the end of Grade 9)

    Sometimes students may want or be required to create their own product. This expectation, along with specific criteria for product evaluation, should be clearly established early in the Information Process, and rubrics are recommended for this purpose. Consideration should also be given to the manner in which products will be shared. Discussion about the anticipated audience is essential. The following questions may be helpful:

    • Will the sharing occur with peers in the students' own classroom?
    • Will they be expected to present their products or findings to others?
    • Where and when will this sharing take place and how long will students have to prepare for this?
    • Will the audience have a role in assessing the presentations or evaluating the products?

    Some considerations about product creation, in addition to audience, may include:

    • Visual appeal
    • Value of sound
    • Appropriateness of a written report (hand-written or using a word processor)
    • Appropriateness of
      - Story board
      - Brochure
      - Flyer
      - Poster
      - Audio or video cassette
      - Interactive Web page(s)
      - Computer-generated charts, tables, or graphs
      - Computer-generated graphics
      - Computer-generated slides or transparencies
      - Hyper-media or multi-media productions (with digital video or audio)

    For products requiring a written component, a first (rough) draft is still recommended, regardless of other product expectations. Many teachers and teacher-librarians build in a "check-point" or conference at this point in the process. Emphasis needs to be placed on synthesis, with students developing their own ideas and constructing some "new" information, not simply paraphrasing or even copying the words and ideas of others. This is especially important where students are using word processing, simply "copying and pasting" text into their own documents without using critical thinking skills to analyze and evaluate before they develop their own thoughts or interpretations. They will also need to acknowledge the use of others' thoughts, ideas, and works by using quotation marks for actual words, and by keeping track of their sources and the bibliographic information required to create a bibliography.

    Careful reviewing and editing are required to ensure that finished written products are representative of the very best work that a student(s) can accomplish.

    Students need to consider a variety of presentation modes. Some of these are:

    • Written reports
    • Newsletter
    • Advertisement
    • Poem
    • Oral report
    • Picture book
    • Panel discussion
    • Letter to the editor
    • Database or spreadsheet
    • Debate
    • Puppet show
    • Drama
    • Song
    • Book jacket
    • Interview
    • Game
    • Comic strip/book
    • Audio or video cassette
    • Interactive Web page(s)
    • Computer-generated charts, tables, or graphs
    • Computer-generated graphics
    • Computer-generated slides or transparencies
    • Hyper-media or multi-media productions (with digital video or audio)

    To view samples of learning strategies/cognitive organizers for students, click on Learning Strategies. You may wish to download/print these strategies, and adapt them for your students!

    Show Me The Student Learning Outcomes For This Stage

    Show Me The Sharing and Presenting Information Stage

    Building Information Literacy Return to Top